Perspective and movement in your personal landscape

It was a cold, misty, frosty morning.

I had traveled up the mountain, where mist, frost and sporadic sunshine were interacting with the environment.

I made my way over the frozen ground towards two trees that were barely visible in the distance. I set up my tripod and took a photograph, shooting into the sun.

Early morning mist

The mist was moving rapidly, coming and going. At times, it was thick, reducing the visibility to a couple of metres. And then there were times, when the sun appeared, bringing with it beautiful light and clarity. There was an on/off process as mist and sun appeared and disappeared. It was a random dance of coming and going. There was no pattern.

Fifteen minutes had passed, since I took the first photograph.

I made my way around the trees and walked down a road that passed by the trees. The mist was retreating quickly. The sun was now 90 degrees to my right and shining brightly. I set up my tripod on the road and took a photograph. Soon after, the mist returned.

Blue skies and frost

The visual reality in a landscape is constantly changing. The same could also be said about one’s own personal landscape.

I have previously written about how time and diversity have an impact on our experiences in our landscapes. Perspective, movement and change should also be considered when examining your experiences in your relationships with others.

If you are feeling stuck in a relationship, you will be locked into one dominant and rigid perspective of (a) yourself, (b) the other person, and/or (c) the nature of the relationship that you are participating in. In such a relationship, it will feel as if there is little or no movement (growth). You will most probably experience a predictable pattern of interaction that closes down or limits your ability to be flexible, playful and/or creative. You may have the feeling of walking on egg shells. Little or no new information will be generated and in conversation, the same things will be said over and over again. On another level, a lot will remain unsaid.

But how can you change your viewpoint in a relationship that you may find restrictive? Depending on the complexity of the issues that the relationship may be struggling with, this may not be easy to achieve. However, below are some guidelines that will help you shift your perspective, as well as offer you the feeling that there is movement in your relationship as you strive to open up new possibilities.   

  • Try to discard the assumptions you have of the relationship, since it is usually your own assumptions that limit and restrict your perspective. Your assumptions are the lenses that you view life through.
  • In order to change your viewpoint, ask yourself to look for something new in the person who you are interacting with. Slow down and do not draw conclusions too quickly. A conclusion closes down a perspective. Instead, give yourself some space and time to look, without judgement. Try and understand more, without drawing any conclusions.
  • Ask questions instead of making statements. This helps to open up new perspectives and encourages movement. Listen more, talk less.
  • Breathe and let go of tension. Lighten and relax.
  • Let go of your ego and one-upmanship. There are no rights or wrongs or truths. There are only perspectives, and these are subjective reflections of one’s inner world.
  • Finally, since you have decided not to walk away from the relationship, be gentle, careful and loving. Remember that relationships are fragile.

When I walk into a landscape to take photographs, I do not have a preconceived idea about what the landscape will offer me. So I walk into the unknown with an open mind, which in turn, opens up possibilities in what I could see. While I  am aware that there are an infinite number of photographs that can be taken, I find myself getting drawn into the landscape where the light is.

Move into the light!

Move into the light

In landscape photography it is light that enhances and ‘uplifts’ a photograph to a new level. The eyes are naturally drawn to the light and when the eyes are directed to points of interest from a compositional perspective, the photograph has an emotional and meaningful impact.

When it comes to light in relationships, being emotionally light has the characteristics of creative playfulness, optimism and openness. Light is the energy of love which is up lifting.

Light is also the interpersonal space where meaning gets created. Light offers the fabric on which diversity of perspectives can be embedded.

IMG_5929-4There may be times in your life when you have to deal with trauma and/or uncertainty. In such times, you will probably feel as if you are trapped in darkness.

img_6683The metaphor of darkness implies that you do not know what to do, where to look and in which direction to move. This activates caution, which in turn, restricts your ability to move. Feeling stuck can cause a downward spiral of helplessness and despondency to unfold.  

Lack of movement will activate your survival instincts, heightening stress and intensity. This tightens  and rigidifies your energy system.

img_5549In times of despair, look for the light and move towards it. Trust the light, it will help guide you when you find yourself in the darkness of ‘not knowing’.

img_7376Let the light draw you into the landscape of your experience. Move in a gentle and loving way. Small steps towards the light. There is no need to rush. The destination is not important. Instead, it is the movement towards the light that eventually offers clarity to your experiences. 

IMG_7539-2When out in the landscape, the light can be illusive. At times, you will have to be patient and wait for the light to arrive. Waiting for the light will highlight aspects of yourself that may need to be addressed. Rigidity of perspective, unrealistic expectations, or self-absorption are likely to emerge during this period of waiting.

In times of darkness, you may question the existence of light. 

It is important to remind yourself that light is a gift that arrives in its own way and in its own time. It is not a mechanical phenomenon that can be directed by your expectations or needs. 

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Have a strategy and be open to the potentiality

To be successful in your endeavour, you need to have a clear intention that directs your energy. This can be termed your plan of action or your strategy. This creates a structure and focus in which to operate, practice and compete.

Coupled with this focus, you also need to be open to the potentiality of possibilities that are unfolding in the present moment. It is in this potentiality that unpredictability resides.

This potentiality will not manifest into a reality, unless you spontaneously and consciously respond to it. In fact, it requires a creative response. You may need to expand or adjust your original strategy in a creative way to make room for a ‘detour’ in your journey.

There are many possibilities unfolding in the present moment. The reality that you experience depends on where you look (your perception) and on your decision whether to act or not (which is predominantly driven by your assumptions and beliefs).

I wanted to photograph the full moon rising above trees in the black forest. This was my vision. I did my research regarding locations and about the time and the direction of where the moon was to rise. This took time and effort, especially looking for a row of trees that could act as the foreground to the rising moon.

I arrived at the location 30 minutes before the moon was to rise. I set up my tripod and attached my camera, and waited. I was ready.

As I stood there gazing in the direction of the expected moonrise, other potentiality existed around me that I had not planned for or had anticipated. As I looked to my right, the beautiful Alps where revealing themselves. I was standing about 50 km inside Germany and the Alps were another 100km or so into Switzerland. The föhn was blowing and with it, the usual haze that normally acted as an obscure blanket, had disappeared.

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To my left, I noticed how the light was striking one of three trees. It was such a simple scene. And in the simplicity lay the beauty.

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Time was moving on and the sun was just about to set. The row of trees from which I was expecting the moon to rise, was bathed in golden light. I put on my telescopic lens and took the trees.

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There was a thick layer of clouds that had formed just above the trees. I was worried that the clouds may drop and hide the rising moon. As I waited, I hoped that the clouds would remain still to provide a window of opportunity for the moon to seize.

There was a 15 minutes period for me to enjoy the full moon rising. And then the moon disappeared as it ascended behind the clouds on its upward journey. 

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If I had not acted on my intention, I would not have experienced all of the photographic gifts that had presented themselves to me. Without acting or doing, not much is possible.  

Being in a box

I was sitting alone in a coffee stop in Frankfurt reflecting on my participation in a workshop on business coaching. I was busy examining a work dilemma that I was having that was embedded in (a) the philosophy that underpins helping others and (b) the paradigm of thinking that directs and organises information flow in how one interprets human behaviour that unfolds in an interpersonal context.

I was deeply wrapped up in thought as I looked out of the window of the coffee shop.

A tiny, yet bright light shining in the distance immediately caught my attention. It was a light that could be easily missed, if you were not looking in that direction. There were many other competing visual and auditory distractions around me; traffic lights, people and cars passing by, laughter and chatter as people enjoyed their coffee, and the familiar sound of the machine grinding the coffee beans to produce the addictive auroma of the coffee to be served. Any one of these processes, at that specific moment, could have diverted my eyes away from the reality of the existence of this tiny source of light.

It was a light that only lasted a couple of minutes, just before the sun moved below the horizon.

The light was coming from a cross on a church, reflecting the rays of a sun that was about to set. While I do not belong to any one specific religious denomination; for me, the cross symbolises peace, tolerance, compassion and wisdom.

A bright, tiny light in the distance

Once I had noticed the light, I couldn’t stop looking at it. Its strength, power, significance and magnetism far surpassed its size.

As I looked at it, I was catapulted out of my internal debate. A clear meaningful insight about my dilemma was being transmitted by this tiny light. The insight bypassed my intellectual reasoning. Its magnetism ‘pulled’ me out of my previous train of thought. Instantaneously, I felt that I had been transported into an emotional and intellectual space where I could move freely between the opposing poles of the dilemma.

I immediately felt out of the box.

I felt free from the constriction that the dilemma had imposed on me. There was relief, coupled with a feeling of emotional strength.

As I continued looking at the tiny light in the distance, I was struck by its authenticity and beauty. In exploring my feelings further about the workshop that I had participated in, I realised how much courage it takes to be transparent and authentic in an interpersonal context that may be quick to define and judge you according to who they think you are (or believe who you should be).

The river Main separates the beautiful urban skyline of Frankfurt (representing the mechological powers of man) from the ecological rhythm of a gorgeous golden sunset unfolding behind a church.

A dualistic tension can emerge between the mechological and ecological approaches to understanding and solving human problems. As I moved out of the box, I felt free to jump in and out of each paradigm. This liberation offered me a wider and deeper perspective of the dilemma that the clash of mechological and ecological thinking can cause.

As the sun set, the tiny light still shone brightly in my mind as I left the coffee shop and made my way to the airport.

Shine your light in winter

Growth is not possible during a severe winter. The predominant concern for all living things during this period is one of survival.

Metaphorically, I feel that we are in a global spiritual winter at the moment. This feeling is exacerbated by the way many political leaders are conducting themselves at present. Ethics have given way to lies, corruption and manipulation. In the process, trust no longer exists and hope fades quickly as the harshness of the winter reality hits everyone. Darkness descends, and the possibility of sustainable growth wanes as the system struggles to sustain the values of honesty, courage and compassion. There are many weak enablers that add to (and benefit from) the wintery conditions; running and hiding for shelter while looking after their own comforts.

Over the weekend, I was outdoors taking photographs of the snow, wintery landscape. In late afternoon, I walked passed a small field of dead sunflowers as the sun was trying to break through the dense cloud cover. As the rays gained strength and penetrated the cover ever so slightly, I felt light and joyful.

As I looked at the sunflowers, I knew that each one of them contained the seeds of new life. The potential energy of growth existed in the seeds that lay dormant during winter. Nature is self-generating and in times of winter, it is not necessary to lose hope in a future that is still to unfold.

As the sun broke through, I was reminded of how light changes one’s perspective. During cold wintery days, everyone hankers after light. Feeling the warmth of the sun, just for a couple of minutes, helps to lift the spirit.

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When reflections in the water are added to light, the snowscape is enhanced dramatically.

Walking in the wintery landscape in Germany over this weekend helped remind me of the power of light and reflection when interacting with others and dealing with challenging situations.

Shining one’s light in wintery conditions lifts spirits. Being emotionally light, honest, compassionate and courageous in one’s relationships brings warmth and hope to others.

In a field of poppies

Recently, I was walking in a field of poppies. Four photographs caught my attention.

Never ending sameness

Every poppy played a part in the wholeness. Never ending sameness created an expanse of beauty and highlighted that the group took precedence over the individual.

In team sports, for example, ‘We before I’ is a philosophy that helps teams create a cohesive focused energy that goes beyond the individual. Being part of a team may require an individual to be selfless at times. This will occur when an individual aligns him/herself to a meaningful group vision.

Tall poppy

The poppies tended to be of the same height. However, there were a few that stood out and were taller. Not many, but a few.

Many societies and groups demand conformity. They feel threatened by individuality. Being able to stand tall is necessary if you wish to fulfill your potential. However, this may not come naturally or easily. Learning to see yourself in your highest light and expecting more from yourself may require courage for you to walk your own path at times.

In context

In some photographs, the poppies clearly stood out and appeared to be bigger and more pronounced than their surrounding. In reality they were small and looked somewhat fragile in the field.

When looking at a specific piece of information, it is always necessary to understand the broader context in which anything exists. Context defines meaning and puts things into perspective.

Beauty in the light

There is a natural tension between individual and group needs. When this tension is integrated in a respectful way, an amazing beauty emerges that can never be anticipated. Light always shines through in such cases.

Seeking to integrate dynamic opposites is a complex challenge. This requires a systemic philosophy that embraces diversity and understands the inter-connected fabric of life. Extreme perspectives that deny or prevent alternative viewpoints results in division, exclusion, resistance and anger.

The tension that exists between globalization and nationalization (separatism) should never be examined in an either/or manner, but rather considered according to the philosophy of both/and. The self-absorbed, egotistical Trump is incapable of grasping this fundamental idea of both/and regarding any issue. He has decided to withdraw the USA from the Paris Accord on climate change and global warming. His decision highlights how self-centred, simplistic and archaic his worldview is regarding global issues.

Due to his narcissistic, bombastic and arrogant attitude (coupled with his lack of insight) more and more rifts will occur whenever he is called on to make a decision. Harmony and beauty will recede whenever he is involved in a process. Instead, more conflict will be activated as he feebly attempts to lead a Divided States of America that continues to polarize as time goes on. His biggest threat will not be an external one (such as immigration or terrorism), but instead, will be an internal one in which he will be the centre of a self-induced implosion as his own country fragments.

Part 7: Playing

Playing
Playing

As I approached the beach I could hear the laughter. A group of children where playing in the sea. I could feel their joy jump through the lens as I took the photograph.

A child’s natural energy is playful, spontaneous and joyful. A child does not need to be taught how to play.

Most people consider work and play to be mutually exclusive. In today’s society, this certainly seems to be the case. Work is serious, considered to be very important and is done by adults. There is usually a clearly defined task or activity to be done, and after completion of this, you are rewarded financially. A signed contract governs what you can or cannot do, how long this should take, and the benefits that you will receive in the process. Unfortunately, work has been formalised and regulated to the point that it has become sterile and meaningless. In the process, work has also become stressful. The heart energy of a person shuts down under these conditions. When this occurs, work loses its ‘soul’.

Playful energy is at the heart of creativity. Being playful is a way of being, that encompasses lightness, joy, freedom and spontaneity.

Sport is formalised play. Professional sport offers the athlete the opportunity to integrate the worlds of work and play. The challenge for the professional athlete is not to lose sight of the fundamental reason why sport was chosen as work. When the energy of joy and love is brought onto the field of work (play), exceptional performances occur.